December 27, 1908

More Presents From Mayor's
Christmas Tree.
It was announced in yesterday's Journal that about 700 children had failed to get a present at the mayor's Christmas tree in Convention hall on Christmas, and that tickets had been given them to return Saturday at 2 p. m., when sacks would be given them. About noon a telephone message was sent to police headquarters that over 2,500 boys were massed at the hall and police were asked for to keep order.

A great many of the policemen who were sent had been on duty there the day before and they recognized scores of boys whom they had seen get a package on Christmas day. When the kids were asked what they were doing there they answered, "We are after what we kin git that's what we're here fer." That class of repeaters were put out of line and only those who had tickets were admitted. With all of that care the little sharpers managed to get in on the second day's festivities.

After the packages fell short Christmas day -- on account of so many children from the outside which were not counted on -- Captain J. F. Pelletier, head of the purchasing committee,, went that evening and bought 1,000 more substantial toys and candy, nuts and fruit to go in the bags. Early yesterday morning, in response to a notice in The Journal, about twenty of the tired women who had worked so hard all week, reported at the hall and when the gifts arrived began work. All was in readiness at 3 p. m., but there was no crowding or jamming in the hall, as only those with tickets were admitted.

J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute arrived at the hall soon after the long line of boys had been formed. As he walked up the line many of them ducked out, hid their faces and ran to the end of the line and got in again.

"Every child from my district was here yesterday," he said as he came in the hall. "They all got something, for I saw them. They are all outside again."

E. T. Bringham, superintendent of the Helping Hand institute, recognized many familiar faces from the North End which he had seen in the lines with sacks on Christmas day.

Many women came yesterday with one ticket and from two and a half dozen children. They wanted one ticket to admit them all. They swore that they had been overlooked, but when the little fellows were taken aside -- those little ones who know only the truth -- they would tell just what they had got when they were there the day before.

One woman with one little girl and one ticket was admitted. "I have four at home with the whooping cough. I want a bundle for them." She was given four extra bundles, appropriate for the sick ones and asked where she lived. "Over in Armourdale," she said, "and I want one of them whips for each one of them, and one of them tops that dance, and one of anything else you've got." She was given a street car ticket for her little girl and told to try and be satisfied with her five packages. She was mad and showed it by what she said in the most spiteful manner.

Two small boys who had succeeded in washing the stamp from their hands Christmas day in time to get back to the hall and get tickets of admission to yesterday's event, were heard to say after they examined their sacks, "Huh, dis is better'n we got yesterday, ain't it?"

Most of those who were admitted on tickets yesterday and who got sacks were of the very deserving kind. The were of the more timid ones who had been crowded out Christmas day and their joy was depicted in their faces as they marched happily away, bundles in arms. Between 500 and 700 packages were given out yesterday on tickets. The rest were put aside and will be sent out to the homes where there are sick children who could not get to the hall.