March 25, 1909


Husband, Returning From Office,
Finds Attentions Being Forced
on His Wife -- Fires
Three Shots.

Opening the door of his room to find his wife struggling to free herself from the grasp of another man, Leon Brady of 1014 East Fifteenth street, a mechanical draftsman in the employ of the board of education, shot and fatally wounded Josehp Flanagan, a land promoter of El Hito, N. M. The shooting occurred at 1:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the hallway of the boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth streeet, where both Flanagan and the Brady family lived.

Upon arriving at his office at 1526 Campbell street shortly after lunch yesterday afternoon, Brady "felt that something was wrong at home." He went immediately to the East Fifteenth street boarding house and found the door of his room locked and his wife inside. His wife responded to his knock.

"After I had been in the room a few moments, my wife went out and down to the second floor. I shut the door and waited for her to return. In about five minutes I heard her cough. I listened and she coughed again. Then I went to the door and waited. I could not hear anything at first, but in a moment I heard someone whispering and it seemed excited. Then I heard my wife say: 'No! No! No!' in a half frightened, half sobbing tone.


"I cannot explain my action and I cannot tell how I feel about it now. I saw my wife struggle and I knew the man. I was white with rage and I could not control myself. It was that kind of a situation about which little is remembered and nothing is clear."

Brady rushed to the bureau and grabbed his revolver. Throwing the door open he saw Flanagan and his wife. Then he fired.

Flanagan fell at the first shot. Mrs. Brady uttered a cry and her husband fired twice again at his victim. Flanagan then arose and groped his way to his own room, while Brady went back and put two more cartridges in his revolver. Mrs. Brady, at her husband's request, went to the telephone and notified the police.

Flanagan was taken to the general hospital, where he died two hours later. In his statement to Assistant Prosecutor Garrett, he said he realized he was about to die and had given up all hope. He declared that his relations with Mrs. Brady had never been otherwise than friendly.

At the Walnut street police station where Brady surrendered he stated that Flanagan had persistently attempted to force his attention upon Mrs. Brady. "Flanagan was under the influence of liquor a week ago and he came to our room in that condition. He called my wife by her first name, Rose, and this impression of intimacy with my wife angered me," he said.

"Last Sunday I went out to my father's house at 3115 Benton boulevard, and took Billy, my year-old son, with me. While there someone called me on the telephone, and a woman's voice said, 'You had better come home and see what is doing.' I immediately returned to the boarding house.


"My wife told me when I arrived at the house that Flanagan had come to her room after I left and said to her, 'You are expecting someone.' She told me she was offended by his talk and manner, and asked him why he had taken advantage of my absence to come and see her. He told her that I need not know about it, and my wife told him that she would tell me. Flanagan was angry at that, and said to her, 'I'll fix you if you do. I'll do you dirt.' "

According to the statements of both men, they were out walking together the two evenings before the shooting took place. Both say that on no occasion had Mrs. Brady ever been mentioned by them.

Yesterday at noon when Brady came to lunch he found Flanagan already at the table and sat down with him. They talked during the meal and afterward Brady carried a lunch up to his wife, who is ill and confined to her room.

In an ante-mortem statement Flanagan said Mrs. Brady came out of the room in to the passageway, and following her, Brady appeared and shot him without saying a word. "I fell after the first shot," said he, "and then he fired twice more. I said, 'Oh Brady, Brady, Brady! Why have you done this?' His wife said nothing; simply stood there.

"We had always been good friends and he had never spoken to me about her. She told me to look out for him two days ago. I did not know anything was wrong or that he had anything against me until his wife told me. I ate lunch with him today and and boarded at the same house with them. I have known both of them about four months."


Brady is a graduate of the engineering department of Columbia university in New York and is the son of J. H. Brady, chief engineer of the board of education of Kansas City. He was yesterday elected president of the National Association of Heating and Sanitary Engineers in New York. Young Brady is said by his classmates to have been exceptionally bright and stood high with his teachers and others.

Leaving school he went to Mexico as a mining engineer. While riding on the cowcatcher of one of the small locomotives employed about the mines, the engine struck a burro standing in the tracks. The animal fell on Brady and the force of the impact broke his leg in two places. The injured man was taken to the house of the mine superintendent and nursed back to health by the daughter of the household. During the days when he lay helpless on his bed, he and the girl formed a friendship that gradually ripened into love and they were married three years ago. Since that time a son has been born. The son is a little more than a year old and at the boarding house on East Fifteenth street was the universal favorite.