INCINERATING PLANT THE ONLY SOLUTION. ~ Safe and Sanitary Way to Dispose of Garbage.

August 25, 1909

Safe and Sanitary Way to
Dispose of Garbage.

"The time is at hand for this city to face the garbage problem and to face it in a safe and sanitary sort of way. In my opinion the proper solution lies not only in the collection of all refuse, but also in its final destruction. the city should be provided with an incinerating plant; indeed, it is now so large since the borders have been increased that we should have two such plants."

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, made this suggestion in the first annual report, which he read before the hospital and health board yesterday afternoon.

In discussing this subject Dr. Wheeler tells the board that J. I. Boyer contracted last December to remove garbage three times a day during the months between May and October and twice a day during the other months. The garbage was to be removed away from the city.

"Up to this date," the report states, "Mr. Boyer has not in any particular fulfilled his contract with the city, and, with his present equipment, he will not be able to do so. further, Mr. Boyer has had implicit instructions from your health commissioner that the government officials had warned our department that no more garbage should be dumped into the Missouri river, but Mr. Boyer has, purposely or otherwise, not heeded our protestations in this respect."


Dr. Wheeler speaks of the workhouse as a "veritable pest house for all kinds of diseases." He blames the construction of the place for the unsanitary condition, and says "unfortunates are packed in cells like rats in holes." He suggests that the place be enlarged so that more cell room may be had, that sewer connections be made with each cell and that two wards be built where the attending physician may see that sick prisoners get humane treatment.

The commissioner next takes up the spit nuisance, tells of the ordinance passed concerning spitting in street cars, and says that education has done much to abate the nuisance.

In a long dissertation on "the house fly," he speaks of the diseases that are carried into homes by this insect. It is his opinion that typhoid fever and many intestinal troubles are spread by the fly.

He recommends the destruction of open vaults and that sewage should not be allowed to empty into adjacent streams, but should be destroyed completely. To keep the city in better condition he recommends more inspectors and a system by which tab may be kept on them to see that they work.