August 13, 1909


After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.


"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.


The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.


The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.


It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.