YOUTHFUL RUNAWAYS WALKED 10 MILES. ~ Journey in Hot Sun Made Them Long for Home.

August 29, 1909

Journey in Hot Sun Made Them
Long for Home.

Three foot-sore and weary runaways arrived in Kansas City last night by rail from Valencia, Kas. They were Uhlen and Juanita Templeton, 16 and 18 years old respectively, and Helen Duncan, 16 years old. The trio left Kansas City Monday morning by the Rock Island and rode as far as Topeka, Kas. When they left, their intention was to get to Stanley, N. M., where John Templeton, father of the Templeton youngsters, has a mining claim.


Their money gave out in Topeka and they decided to walk the rest of the way to New Mexico, working at intervals along the way for "lifts" by rail. Monday was a hot day and the ten miles they walked to Valencia all but exhausted them. Uhlen would not allow his sister or Helen to carry a suit case in which were the trio's belongings. After a few miles it was decided to throw the grip away and "hoof it" without burdens.


They arrived at the depot in Valencia, hungry, penniless, their feet blistered by the walk over the railroad ties in the blazing sun. Their presence, unaccompanied and without baggage created suspicion. After several offers had been made to them a young man named John Moore, a "good Samaritan," took them to his mother's home for the night. Tuesday morning a council of war was held and a collection was taken up by the Ladies' Aid Society of one of the local churches and they were sent home, after the matron at the Union depot had been wired to be on the lookout for them.


Mrs. Elizabeth Cole, 3712 East Twelfth street, grandmother of the Templetons, has had the care of them since the death of their mother more than a year ago.

Promising that they would "go straight home," the trio were allowed to leave the Union depot, after the fact concerning Mrs. Cole's residence was learned. They went to the home of Helen Duncan 632 Fremont avenue. When a short distance from that address, Uhlen balked, saying he didn't want to stay there. He left the girls, saying he intended to make his way to his father in New Mexico.


"He was afraid to go to grandma's," said Juanita at her grandmother's home, "for fear he would be scolded by our brother, Lester. When we were in Valencia, Mr. Moore, who was so kind to us, told Uhlen that if he did not like it at home for him to go back up there and he would see that he was cared for. I believe that he will try to beat his way to where pap is, however.."


The police have been ordered to look for Uhlen Templeton, who is 5 feet 2 inches tall and weighs about 120 pounds He has dark hair, dark blue eyes and a fair complexion. When last seen he wore a dark blue serge two-piece suit of clothes and a light shirt. He wore a dark, soft hat and dark shoes. The missing boy, with his brother, Lester, 19 years old, has been working for the Pittsburg Paint and Glass Company, Fifth and Wyandotte streets. His fear of being "roasted" by Lester is said to have been the cause of the sudden departure.

Mrs. Cole, the grandmother, is greatly worried over the absence of the boy, and his sister, Juanita, was in a serious condition from hysterics last night. She said that she had been the cause of Uhlen's going away, and, in her temporary delirium, she believed he had been killed.

"Both of the children are headstrong," said the grandmother. "Uhlen has never left me before. If the police can get Uhlen back for me I believe that both will have been cured of running away."

"It was our intention to work our way to papa in New Mexico," said Juanita, when she became quiet enough to talk. "We had but little money, and after we had been in Topeka a short time it was lost. Then we set out on foot towards the West, Uhlen carrying the grip. After we had walked several miles the brave little fellow nearly gave out, and as he would not allow either of us to carry it, we threw it away. The section hands tried to find it later, but they couldn't. My feet are all blisters, and Uhlen's are worse. I know that I am going to stay right here and never go away again."
Helen Duncan is now safely ensconced at home. The girls had been directed to a boarding house in Valencia where they would be allowed to do housework, while Uhlen did the chores, when they were discovered by Mr. Moore, who took them to his mother.