September 22, 1909


Interment of Principals in Monday
Night's Murder and Suicide
to be Made at Former

With the burial in Atchison, Kas., today of the victims of the tragedy enacted Monday night at the home of S. F. Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, in which Mrs. Sadie Stoll was murdered by William Jacobia, who later committed suicide at his wife's home, the last chapter of their story will have been concluded.

Mrs. Stoll's body was taken to Atchison at 6:30 o'clock last night. It will be buried beside that of her father, who died several weeks ago.

Mrs. William Jacobia, 3235 Forest avenue, will this morning take the body of her husband to Atchison where he will be buried. The wife and child will be the beneficiaries of life insurance carried by Jacobia. The life insurance was partly placed in fraternal organizations. Jacobia carried about $5,000 insurance upon his life. The fact that he left no will gives his wife and son all of his personal property. The insurance is all he left.

That Jacobia formed the Linwood Investment company for the sole purpose of placing his property beyond the possibility of being taken from him in a suit for the alienation of the affections of Mr. Stoll's wife was denied yesterday by his attorney, W. F. Guthrie. Mr. Guthrie for a time acted as trustee of the property owned by Jacobia for the latter and his wife, and later assisted in the financial separation between them.

While Mrs. Stoll refused to give up Jacobia, and give all of her love to her husband, she is said to never have countenanced any idea of leaving her husband and children. While she informed a friend that she loved Jacobia, she said she w ould stay at home on account of her two boys. For a year she drifted along in this fashion, meeting Jacobia daily, and when suspected by her husband pacifying him.

Those persons intimate with the family relations of the Stolls said yesterday that Mr. Stoll never knew of the friendship that existed between his wife and Jacobia, though he became suspicious on many occasions. At such times he is said to have spoken to his wife regarding the rumors he heard, but she always talked him out of his suspicious mood, and it ended by Mr. Stoll apologizing for his mistake. The night of the murder and suicide Mr. Stoll told one of h is intimate friends that he had seen his wife with Jacobia on but two occasions.

The report that Mrs. Stoll's father, J. P. Brown, had assisted in meeting the expenses of the Stoll household was denied yesterday. It was admitted that he often made presents of various sums of money, but that he gave the money to his daughter because she was a favorite.

Albert Stoll, the 14-year-old son who was in the house at the time his mother was murdered, yesterday asserted that he did not know what subject was being discussed by his mother and Jacobia during the quarrel.

Albert did not inform his fatherr of the clandestine meetings because of the love for his mother. The older son, Sam, also failed to tell his father for fear he would kill either Mrs. Stoll or Jacobia and thus create a scandal that might otherwise be dept from the public.

Attorney W. F. Guthrie last night made a written statement in which he denied that Stoll had ever employed him to bring an alienation suit. Speaking for Mr. Stoll, the attorney said that the druggist had never hired detectives to shadow his wife or Jacobia. the attorney said that Mr. Stoll had accused a man of being too intimate with his wife while living in Atchison, and that it became public. The affair caused people to lose confidence in Mr. Stoll, and he was forced to seek another location.

A denial was made by the attorney, who was also attorney for Mrs. Stoll's father, that Mr. Stoll ever received or expected any sum of money from his father-in-law as the price of his continuing to live with his wife.