October 15, 1909


Rev. Caston of Jefferson City Says
Black Boys and Girls Be Edu-
cated and Refers to Macon,
Missouri College.

From all parts of the state are negro Baptists in Independence attending the twentieth annual session of the Baptist state convention which opened yesterday morning and will continue in session through Sunday night. The convention was organized or the moral, intellectual and spiritual uplift of the negro race and is presided over by Rev. J. T. Caston, M. D., of Jefferson city, Mo., a prominent negro preacher in the state.

In calling the convention to order, Dr. Caston said:

"We must lift up our own race. The negro boys and girls must be educated, and it is up to us to do it. There is no man or woman on earth who can inspire the negro like the negro. Our boys and girls are looking up to us and we must not go around with a long face. Let us be men and women.

"Twenty years ago the negro Baptists started out to establish a college in Macon, Mo. It was then that we have put down our money and we have been doing so ever since. You must know what we do. The Western college at Macon stands for itself. We are building up little by little. You need not expect the work to be done in a day or in a night. You must look to the future, look to your own strong black arms, if you would make the race anything or if you would be respected by others."

The convention opened with song and praise service, conducted by Rev. O. P. Goodwin of Shelbina. Deacon W. L. Bennett of Jefferson City was appointed marshal. After services the president appointed a committee on enrollment, consisting of Revs. J. H. Downey, I. H. Robinson, E. S. Redd, Mrs. Bell Wood and Mrs. C. E. Alexander.

The feature of the morning session was the annual sermon preached by the Rev. O. T. Redd, D. D., of Chillicothe, Mo. The work of a gospel minister was laid down in the sermon.

In the afternoon session the Rev. Dr. E. A. Howard, pastor of the First Baptist church, white, was introduced and delivered a strong address. He told the ministers that it was a good thing to live a life of Christ, to be consistent with the teaching of the Bible, to do all in their power to make the race better. He reminded them of what they had before them, what they had to do for themselves. He was glad to see they were striving to make their race better. The address was full of good advice.


Following this Dr. Caston delivered his annual address to the convention, taking up the work of the past year, reviewing the condition of the churches in the state and asking the ministers to unite as never before for the religious and educational training of the whole negro race. He thought that his people should first do for themselves and then appeal for outside help.

The corresponding secretary spoke. The reports of the treasurer and other officials were made. The women showed that they had collected during the session of their convention, which closed Wednesday night, $1,126. Mrs. C. R. McDowell was complimented for her work.

At the night session Rev. John Goins, superintendent of missions, delivered an address. He took up the missionary work of the negro Baptists.

Mayor L. Jones delivered an address of welcome, which was responded to by Dr. S. W. Bacote of Kansas City.

Revs. J. R. Bennett, J. T. Thornley and B. J. Guthrie delivered short addresses and a large collection was lifted for education.