IN WAY, MAJOR'S WIFE GETS DECREE. ~ Told She Hindered His Army Progress, Returns From Islands for Divorce.

January 18, 1910

Told She Hindered His Army
Progress, Returns From
Islands for Divorce.

When Mrs. Ruby B. Rutherford returned to the Philippines after a visit with her mother at Columbia, Mo., her husband, who is a major in the army, met her at the boat and frankly told her he was sorry she came back to hinder his progress as an ambitions officer. Mrs. Rutherford lost no time in returning to "the States." Yesterday a divorce was granted her by Judge Seehorn in the circuit court.

Mrs. Rutherford lives at the Brunswick hotel, at Eleventh street and Broadway. She introduced as character witness her brother, C. P. Bowling, cashier of the Exchange bank of Columbia, and Judge James E. Goodrich of the circuit court. Her daughter, Dorothy, aged 9 years, was not in court.


The Rutherfords had domestic trouble before they went to the islands, and Mrs. Shepherd, wife of a captain, who often visited them at the Presidio, San Francisco, was a witness. Major Rutherford, she said, was insolent.

Mrs. Rutherford said most of her trouble had been at the Presidio, although she said the major stayed out nights after they went to the Philippines and was sorry when she returned to him after visiting at home.

A highball incident when Mrs. Rutherford gave a party at the Presidio was told in court. She said they ran out of whisky. She thought they had had enough, any way.


Another officer insisted, Mrs. Rutherford said, in going out for one more bottle. When he returned Mrs. Rutherford had her highball made "light," and Major Rutherford was angry because it wasn't the same strength as the drinks served the guests.

"When I insisted on a light drink," said Mrs. Rutherford, "my husband became angry because I did not drink as fast as he thought I should and he came and pured whisky into my glass until it ran all over me."

Mrs. Rutherford testified that while she liked to have a clean, neat house her husband, in his insolent manner, always made fun of her tidiness.


One of his delights, she said, was to finish his meal before his wife and then "rear" back in his chair and put his feet on the table.

When Major Rutherford, the wife testified, told her she was a "drawback," that she hindered his progress in the army and that he was downright sorry to see her back again, she left him, determined to sue for divorce.

Major Rutherford is connected with the medical corps and has an income of $4,000 yearly. They were married at Columbia, Mo., January 10, 1900, and Mrs. Rutherford left him February 14, 1909.