SIGNORA TO JOIN ISNARDI? ~ She Is Happy at Sumptuous Dinner on Eve of Departure.

February 2, 1910

She Is Happy at Sumptuous Dinner
on Eve of Departure.

Since Peter Isnardi left "Little Italy" three weeks ago, the residents of that section have employed their time chiefly in simmering down their financial losses so as to present them to the county attorney and wondering where the delinquent consular agent went when he left here. Opinion seems to be almost equally divided, some holding that he committed suicide by throwing himself into the Missouri river, and others that he dropped inconspicuously across the line into Mexico where the law would protect him from any embezzlement charge preferred by his enemies.

Those inclined to the latter theory felt themselves vindicated yesterday when it was learned that Signora Marguerite Isnardi also was preparing to leave the city and refused to tell anybody where she was bound.

Before the consular agent left he borrowed heavily from his friend and among those who lost in this manner was Antonio Sansone, living close to the consulate at 653 Cherry street. In part payment of what Isnardi owed Sansone, the signora yesterday turned over to him all her furniture. With her grips and trunk packed she then repaired to a restaurant and had a sumptuous dinner in which it is said wine figured. Several of her friends were present. She was happy.

"Where are you going?" someone asked the signora.

"I am going away; who knows where?" she answered with a characteristic shrug. "Perhaps I will be back soon, perhaps not."

The conversation lagged after that vague bit of information for the simple reason that one party to it could not speak very many English words.

"I am convinced that Signora Isnardi is going to join her husband," said J. P. Deo, editor of the Osservatore, an Italian newspaper at 210 East Fifth street. "Of course, we don't blame her for that, but we are naturally curious as to her destination and she certainly won't tell.

"Since Isnardi left here so suddenly people have been coming to light every day who have lost all the way from $10 to $1,000. The amount of money loaned or entrusted to the care of the man really is enormous when you come to think about it all coming from poor folks.

"A reward of $300 will be offered by the Italians for information leading to the location of Isnardi. First, however, I want to look into the law governing his case. I may also write an open letter to Guido Sabetta, the consul to Chicago."