NOT A HUNGRY PERSON LEFT. ~ If There Was, It Wasn't the Fault of Givers of Dinners.

November 27, 1908

If There Was, It Wasn't the Fault
of Givers of Dinners.

Amid the general rejoicing and feeling of goodfellowship incident to a perfect Thanksgiving day, the less fortunate inhabitants of the city were not forgotten. At every charitable institution in the city a dinner was provided for the inmates. The Salvation Army, Franklin institute, Union mission and other organizations of like character fed hundreds of poor persons, and sent many baskets of provisions to deserving families who were unable to attend the dinners.

The Union mission, at Eighteenth and McGee streets, provided a dinner and fed over 400 persons. Special invitations had been sent out and persons from Rosedale, Argentine, Kansas City, Kas., and country districts attended the dinner. Everything in the way of eatables was provided, and if any person in Kansas City went without a Thanksgiving dinner yesterday it was not because of a lack of opportunity.

"It was certainly good to see those poor persons eat," said the Rev. Mrs. Rose Cockriel, the pastor of the mission. "Those who came to the dinner ranged in age from 7 weeks to 33 years, and they all appeared to enjoy themselves. Six little boys, the oldest one 10 years of age, walked in from beyond the Blue river. We gave them their dinner and a basket of provisions to take to their home."

At the Old Folks and Orphans' home the day was celebrated with an old-fashioned dinner, turkey, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pies and everything that should be eaten on that day. At the Perry Orphan Boys' home 130 boys partook of the good things that had been provided for them.

At the Working Girls' hotel there was really a day of thanksgiving, not alone because of the excellent dinner, for in addition to that some unknown friend donated a high grade piano to the institution. From the standpoint of charity and general cause for thankfulness, the day was very much a success.

At the county jail Marshal Al Heslip provided a dinner for the prisoners, of whom there now are fewer than 200. All the trimmings went with the spread. Eatables out of the ordinary also were served at the Detention home, where juvenile prisoners are confined.