January 12, 1909




Batteries Fire Salute of Seventeen
Guns in Honor of the New
Executive -- Hadley De-
fines Policies.
Herbert Spencer Hadley, Governor of Missouri

JEFFERSON CITY, Jan 11. -- (Special.) With the inauguration today of Herbert S. Hadley, Missouri, for the first time in nearly forty years, has a Republican governor.

Governor Hadley was inducted into office in a snowstorm. A week ago Governor Joseph W. Folk informally surrendered the mansion house to Mr. and Mrs. Hadley, but in order to have everything ceremonial today, the Folks and Hadleys returned to their old homes. At 11 o'clock Governor Folk left the mansion house, attended by the Third regiment of infantry from Kansas City, and a detachment of artillerymen from St. Louis, and made a ceremonial call upon Mr. Hadley, traveling in a carriage.

Mr. Hadley joined the retiring governor in the carriage, and the two made their way to the capitol, reaching there shortly before noon. The retiring and incoming state officials, excepting the lieutenant governor and the claimants, were assembled in the executive offices. When the party was completed by the arrival of Mr. Hadley and Governor Folk, all of them went to the house of representatives to be sworn in.


The hall was packed to its full capacity, and there was tumult in the corridors, caused by hundreds fighting for admittance, which they were unable to gain. The members of the supreme court occupied the speaker's stand, Justice Henry Lamm acting as president. He is the only Republican member of the supreme court.

With little ado Mr. Hadley, walking by the side of the retiring governor, went to where Mr. Justice Lamm was standing, and, being told by the justice to do so, raised his hand and the administration of the oath began.

John C. McKinley, the retiring lieutenant governor, acting as president of the joint session of the legislature which was in session for the inaugural, caused some apprehension when, because of the noise in the corridor, he loudly ordered the sergeant-at-arms to "eject the disturbers from the state house."


The prospect of hostilities caused the chief justice to pause in the administration of his oath. Hie own hand, which had been raised aloft, dropped to his side. Mr. Hadley did not do this. His hand was up for keeps, and he kept it there until the justice could resume and conclude. A

As soon as Governor Hadley was in office and Governor Folk automatically out of office the other officers were lined up and sworn in en masse. These were James Cowgill, treasurer; John D. Gordon, auditor; Cornelius Roach, secretary of state; Elliot W. Majors, attorney general; John A. Knott, railroad and warehouse commissioner.

Cannons began booming after the inauguration announcing the fact to the world, whereupon Governor Hadley made his inaugural address. He said:

"In the performance of the duties of the office of governor, my sole ambition and desire will be to continue to deserve the confidence and approval of the people of Missouri.

"Forty years have come and gone since a candidate of the Republican party was inaugurated as governor of this state. It will be sufficient for the purposes of this occasion to learn from the last half century of Missouri's history a lesson of conservatism and official fairness in the conduct of public affairs. And the political differences need not interfere with the performance of official duties, has been emphasized during the course of the last four years. For during that time, the state officials, partly of one party, and partly of another, have worked together in complete harmony and effectiveness.

"And the people have thus learned that no political party is entirely bad, and that no political party can claim a monopoly of official honesty and virtue.

"It is also necessary that we should be ever mindful of the fact that the powers of government are divided between the legislative, the executive and the judicial departments. While the rights and authority of each are intimately related with the others, yet it is also necessary that each should exercise its own powers, without interference from the others.


"There will be no questions considered by you which are more important than those connected with the work of education. It has been frequently charged that too much money is being expended for the conduct of the state university. I do not believe that there is any substantial basis of complaint on account of any disparity in the distribution of revenues of the state between the state university and the other parts of our educational system.

"But that something is wrong with our work of education is readily apparent by the examination of the statistics as to the illiteracy of our children of school age. According to the statistics of 1900, among the forty-eight states of the national Union, our rank in literacy was 31.

"It is worthy of notice that Missouri is one of four states in the Union that has no provision for superintendents of schools in each county of the state. And the fact that the other three states, namely Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi all have a lower rank of literacy than Missouri may tend to explain this unsatisfactory condition.

"While I claim no special knowledge or experience in matters of education, I do feel that the effectiveness of the common schools of the state must be raised if we are to make any substantial progress in the correction of the present unsatisfactory conditions.

"In no department of work has greater progress been made than in the study and investigation of agriculture, horticulture and the raising and care of live stock. The importance of this work in increasing the wealth and happiness of the people of the state cannot be overestimated. There should be no lack of funds to carry on this work in the most thorough manner possible.

"Under the scientific direction of the representatives of the state, and those whom it educates, should be conducted: The investigation of mineral deposits; the means of improving fertility and productivity of the soil; the growth and conservation of our forests; the use of our water power; the development of our water highways; the improvement of the conditions of life and the protection of the health and welfare of our people.


"The Missourian has bee the great pioneer. Missouri was the first state lying wholly west of the Mississippi to be admitted to the union. Maine entered the Union upon the shoulders of Missouri.

"For forty years Missouri stood as an outpost of civilization, reaching out into the unknown and undeveloped West. From her borders radiated those two great highways of Western exploration, travel, commerce and of conquest, on ending in the Northwest on the shores of the Pacific, and the other in the Southwest, in the land of the Mexican and the Spaniard. And along these great highways marched those hardy Missouri pioneers, hunters, trappers, traders and soldiers who were to bind our national domain, that great empire that lies between the Mississippi and the Pacific, by stronger ties than treaties and laws.

"The Missourian has been the pioneer of the West, leading the westward march of civilization across the American continent.

"The glory of Missouri is not alone in the glory that comes from things done in the past. She lives today in the active, throbbing, eager life of the civilization of the twentieth century. And in that great moral awakening which has swept across the country, creating an increased interest in the exercise of the duties of citizenship, raising the standard of honesty and efficiency in the public service and in the working out of those great problems which, as the product of our complex and commercialized civilization, confront us today, Missouri has also been something of a pioneer."