IN HIS OWN WORDS. ~ Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Written by Himself.

May 30, 1909

Ex-Governor's Life Sketch, as Writ-
ten by Himself.

Here is a brief sketch of the ex-governor's life, as given by himself in his own words:

"I was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky., on a farm near Shelbyville. My father, Henry Crittenden, died when I was two years old leaving my mother a widow with five sons; three daughters had died in infancy; the oldest son was not over 15 years of age. My mother was remarried after a few years to Colonel Murry of Cloverport, K y., and five children were born of this union.

"My education was begun at a small subscription school at Shelbyville and continued until I was old enough to go to Center college at Danville, from which I was graduated in the class that had in it Judge John of this city, Governor John Young Brown, W. P. C. Breckinridge, Boyd Winchester and other noted men. I studied law in Frankfort in the office of John J. Crittenden and married in Frankfort Miss Carrie W. Jackson. Soon afterwards I removed to Lexington, Mo., where I opened my first law office. I remained there till the war broke out, when I assisted John F. Philips in raising a regiment of Union soldiers that was sworn in at Georgetown, Pettis county, in 1862, for three years. The regiment was mustered out April 7, 1865 two days before Lee's surrender. At the close of the war I removed to Warrensburg, as feeling still ran high at Lexington. I formed a law partnership with Frances M. Cockrell, who returned from the Confederate service at the close of the war. We practiced law successfully until I was elected to congress in 1872, but the partnership was not dissolved. It continued until General Cockrell was elected United States senator. I remained in congress until 1878 when I refused to be a candidate for re-election. I was nominated for governor over John S. Marmaduke, who became my successor and John A. Hockaday, who had been attorney general under my predecessor.


"The four years of my administration are known to all the older citizens of the state. Phil E. Chappel of this city was state treasurer during my administration,and no state ever had a more honest, faithful or intelligent official.

"My administration was perhaps the most tempestuous in the state's history. We had so many questions of great importance to settle, which agitated every part of the state. One was the great lawsuit with the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad; as governor I advertised the road for sale. The state won on every point we raised. My efforts to break up the James gang, the most noted band of outlaws ever known in the United States, are familiar to all.


"After I left Jefferson City I came to Kansas City, in 1885 and resumed the practice of law. I had been out of law office so often in my life and been out of practice so long that I had lost almost all connection with the law and had got behind in my knowledge of the books. I had virtually lost my disposition to return to practice. But the law is a jealous mistress and will not favor any man who deserts it on all occasions.

"I was given the post of consul general to Mexico by President Cleveland in 1893 and absented myself from my own country for four years. My life in Mexico was very pleasant. There were many charms about such a life then and there are more now. I returned to Kansas City and have been here ever since, living a quiet and pleasant life with my family and friends in one of the greatest young cities in the world."