August 22, 1909


Anniversary of Her Birth Was Cele-
brated Yesterday -- Two Sons
Are Ministers -- Five Weigh
Over 200 Pounds Each.
Four of the Five Generations in Milbra R. Campbell's Family.

Six children, twenty-eight grandchildren, fifty-two great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

The foregoing are the living descendants of Mrs. Milbra R. Campbell, whose eighty-fourth birth anniversary was celebrated yesterday at the home of her son, George W. Campbell, 728 Wabash avenue. All the five sons who attended are over six feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds each. They are Rev. John A. Campbell of Chillicothe, Tex., Rev. W. T. Campbell of Pueblo, Col., both ministers in the Baptist church, James H., George W. and David Campbell, all engaged in the live stock commission business in this city. Mrs. E. J. Henry, the only daughter, 1221 Bales avenue, was detained at home on account of illness.

At 1 o'clock a dinner was served to the immediate relatives attending the anniversary. During the afternoon an informal reception was held for relatives and friends. A photographer took pictures of "Grandma" Campbell, as she is familiarly known, and her five stalwart sons. After that group pictures of those present, representing many generations, were taken.


The accompanying photograph represents but four generations of the Campbell family. There are now five. This picture was taken eleven years ago and shows Mrs. Campbell, her only daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Henry, her son, Charles D. Henry and the latter's daughter, Miss Dorothy J. Henry, now in her sixteenth year.

The Rev. W. T. Campbell, who is here with his four children from Pueblo, Col., where he is pastor of the First Baptist church, is not a stranger in Kansas City. He held several pastorates in this city and organized what is now known as the Olive street Baptist church. He will occupy the pulpit there this morning and tonight. Rev. Mr. Campbell was also a pastor of a church in Independence, Mo., for four years.

The ancestors of this sturdy family, in which there has been no deaths since 1864, came from Scotland and the North of Ireland. In 1836 the father and mother immigrated from Tennessee and settled among the early pioneers in Northwestern Arkansas.


The father, who was born in 1826, served in the United States army during the Mexican war of 1847. When volunteers were being called for to stay the failing fortunes of the Confederacy he volunteered to the governor of Arkansas in 1861 and was made captain of Company D, Fourteenth Arkansas infantry. After being engaged in many battles he surrendered with his company at Fort Hudson, July 8, 1863, and was made a prisoner of war. He died shortly afterward of a disease contracted in the army.

J. H. Campbell, the oldest brother, and John A. Campbell, now a minister, enlisted in the Confederate army later on and were with General Price in most of his big fights, and with Price's raid into Missouri. John was severely wounded in the battle of the Little Blue and captured, spending the rest of the war time in a military prison at Indianapolis, Ind. J. H. Campbell served with Price until the surrender at Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Both brothers were in the same company.