SWOPE'S BODY LIES IN STATE. ~ At 9 o'Clock This Morning Public Will Be Admitted to Rotunda of Library to Pay Last Tribute.

October 7, 1909

At 9 o'Clock This Morning Public
Will Be Admitted to Rotunda of
Library to Pay Last Tribute.

The body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Kansas City's great public benefactor, now lies in state in the rotunda of the public library building, Ninth and Locust streets. The body rests in a massive state casket with deep scroll mountings. The casket, copper lined, is made of the finest mahogany, covered with black cloth. Solid silver handles extend the full length on each side.

At 9'o'clock this morning the public will be admitted and given an opportunity to look for the last time upon the face of Kansas City's most beloved citizen. Last night the body was guarded by a cordon of police commanded by Sergeants T. S. Eubanks and John Ravenscamp. They will be relieved this morning by others. The police will be on guard until the funeral.

At 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mayor Crittenden accompanied by Police Commissioner R. B. Middlebrook and Aldermen O'Malley, Edwards and Wirtman from the upper house and Aldermen Morris and Gilman from the lower house of the council, went to Independence to receive Colonel Swope's body.

It was 4:10 o'clock when Mayor Llewellyn Jones of Independence, accompanied by the city council of that city, made formal delivery of the body. It was carried to the waiting hearse, by G. D. Clinton, J. Wesley Clement, H. A. Major, A. L. Anderson, J. G. Paxon and M. L. Jones, all citizens of Independence.

Ten mounted policemen, commanded by Sergent Estes of the mounted force, acted as convoy to this city. It was at first planned that the Independence officials should accompany the body as far only as their city limits. However, they came to this city and saw the casket placed in state in the library. Those who came from Independence were Mayor Jones and Aldermen E. C. Harrington, J. Wesley Clement. H. A. Major, M. L. Jones, A. L. Anderson and Walter Shimfessel.

Upon arriving at the public library six stalwart policemen removed the casket from the hearse and placed it on pedestals in the rotunda. After giving instructions to the police on guard, Mayor Crittenden and Commissioner Middlebrook left with the members of the council.

Only one relative from out of the city, Stuart S. Fleming of Columbia, Tenn., is at the Swope home in Independence. He arrived yesterday. Colonel Swope was his uncle. Last Friday night, James Moss Hunton, Mr. Fleming's cousin, died at the Swope home. A few hours after he received notice of his death, Mr. Fleming's wife passed away. Sunday night he received notice that his uncle, Colonel Swope, was dead.

"My mother, Colonel Swope's sister, is 77 years old," said Mr. Fleming yesterday. "She is prostrated and was unable to accompany me."