October 30, 1909


Prisoner, Who Wrote Threatening
Letters to R. A. Long, Will Be
Turned Over to Federal
Authorities Today.

After "sweating" Thaddeus S. Wilson all day yesterday, E. P. Boyle, inspector of detectives, finally obtained a confession from the young man last night in which Wilson admitted that he had not only sent the two threatening letters to R. A. Long on Thursday but also had broken into the office of the Moneyweight Scale Company, 730 Delaware street, about three months ago.

"I might as well own up," he admitted. "You have the goods on me."

His signed statement offered the confession not only to sending threatening letters to R. A. Long, but also of the burglary of checks and money from the offices of the Moneyweight Scale Company on the night of September 8.

Although state law is drastic in its punishment of blackmailers, and the letter in which $5,000 is demanded is clearly within that class, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle announced last night that Wilson would be turned over to the federal authorities today.

The United States punishes with unusual severity persons who attempt to use the mails to defraud, and in Wilson's case there is no avenue of escape. Wilson will be taken in charge by the postoffice inspector.

Close questioning of Wilson yesterday afternoon at police headquarters by Inspector Boyle elicited the information that R. A. Long was not the only Kansas City man from whom he had demanded money.

Lawrence M. Jones was requested to send $1,000 to the young man September 6, but had paid no attention to the matter.


When Wilson first came to Kansas City three months ago, he secured employment with the scale company. A few days later the place was robbed. Among the papers taken from the safe was $75 in currency. A couple of days following the robbery, Mr. Shomo of the Moneyweight Scale Company received an anonymous letter signed "C. O. D. 1239." A promissory note was also enclosed in which "C. O. D." intends to pay back the $75. The letter follows:

"KANSAS CITY, MO., September, 1909.
"Dear Sir: You will please find inclosed certain papers that are perhaps of value to you, also note covering the amount with interest computed that looks good to me. Thanks, humbly, C. O. D. 1239.
"P. S. -- Better send to Wichita and tell Mr. Reade to send another money order.
"P. S. 2 -- Say while I was sitting there in that big chair a bluecoat and a graycoat came along, saw an open window and began to talk about it. Yes, they wondered if any one was in there. I began to think it was a hell of a place for me. But I had to sit there and take it. Come very near offering them a ten spot to go on away and leave me alone. Then I heard one of them say to the other one:

" 'Crawl in through that window and see what's wrong inside.'

"Things getting hotter for me.

" 'Me?' says the bluecoat. 'Oh, no.'

"If I had been out in the country I'd laughed out. Come I couldn't. Well, they argued which it should be to go in. Well, they finally said they would send the janitor.

" 'No, no, no! I'm not on the police force yet,' says he. Then there was some more arguing. Well, they came back and looked at the crack in the window with more argument. I was afraid I would have to give up that ten spot. They said they would wait and see. I don't know where they waited. I didn't see them when I made my exit.

"I will close. I would like to tell you some more about those cops. They're true bloods, all right. Say, you will get my check someday. C."