THIS 'VAGRANT' HAD A JOB. ~ But He Lost It Because He Was Arrested for Loafing.

January 10, 1909

But He Lost It Because He Was Ar-
rested for Loafing.

In spite of the fact that he had a job as a cook, Harry Moore appeared yesterday morning, charged with vagrancy. He was arrested Friday night by Patrolman Bryan Underwood at the Union depot. Underwood accused Moore of loafing around the depot, and testified that Moore had his hand in another man's coat pocket when arrested.

The defendant testified that he came here from Sedalia four days ago, and had been staying at the Helping Hand institute. He denied that he was a vagrant, and said that he had secured a job as cook in a hotel on Union avenue. Moore said he did not have his hand in the man's pocket, and there was no witness but the officer. The prisoner told Judge Harry G. Kyle that he had importuned the patrolman to go across the street from the depot and verify his story as to the place of the cook, but that the patrolman refused.

Judge Kyle fined Moore $50 and then gave him a stay of execution, and turned him over to the Helping Hand authorities. F. H. Ream, spiritual adviser of the institute, went to the hotel named by Moore, and the proprietor confirmed his story, and said he was compelled to engage another man yesterday in his place.